Books

Our Latest READ!!

KRIK? KRAK by Edwidge Danticat

Survivors at sea in a too-small, leaky boat endure any indignity for the chance at escape. A woman must watch her mother rot in prison for political crimes. A young father longs so much to fly that he gives his life for a few moments in the air. A prostitute plies her trade while her son sleeps. This collection of  interrelated short stories presents the realities of daily Haitian life. Despite the harshness, Danticat beautifully balances the poverty, despair, and brutality her characters endure with magic and myth. For many characters, she also explores the inevitable clash between traditions of Haitian home life and a new American culture. Mothers and daughters confront each other in these cultural and intergenerational wars, wars that would be emotionally devastating were it not for the indomitable presence of Love.

WHITE LINES by TRACY BROWN

Jada left home at the age of sixteen, running from her own demons and the horrors of physical abuse inflicted by her mother’s boyfriend. She partied hard, and life seemed good when she was with Born, the neighborhood kingpin whose name was synonymous with money, power, and respect. But all his love couldn’t save her from a crack addiction. Jada goes from crack addict and prostitute to survivor and back again before she finds the strength to live for herself and come out on top. And her stormy romance with one of the fiercest hustlers on the streets makes White Lines one of the most unforgettable urban loves stories of the year.

MOTION IN POETRY  by Motion

“Heart of a b-girl; soul of a poet…”

Motion in Poetry charts a journey in language that is rich in contemporary African-Canadian rhythms. Invoking the spirit of Toronto’s dub poet legends, Motion in Poetry reads like a swaying ride through life, love, raw desire, political irony, fiery emotions about race, class and gender, touching sadness and sweet, dry humour.

FOR COLORED GIRLS WHO CONSIDERED SUICIDE WHEN THE RAINBOW IS ENUF by NTOZAKE SHANGE

for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf is a series of 20 poems, collectively called a “choreopoem,” a poem choreographed to music.  Shange’s stage directions provide a sense of the interrelationships among the performers and of their gestures and dance movements.

Shange’s poetry expresses the many struggles and obstacles that African-American women face throughout their lives. It is performed by a cast of seven women characters, each of whom is known only by a color: “Lady in Yellow,” “Lady in Purple,” etc.

The poems deal with love, abandonment, rape and abortion, embodied by each woman’s story.

The end of the play brings together all of the women for “a laying of hands,” in which Shange evokes the power of womanhood as the Lady in Red begins the mantra

“I found God in myself/and I loved her/I loved her fiercely.”

IKNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS by MAYA ANGELOU

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

by Maya Angelou

The free bird leaps
on the back of the win
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wings
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with fearful trill
of the things unknown
but longed for still
and is tune is heard
on the distant hillfor the caged bird
sings of freedom

The free bird thinks of another breeze
an the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn
and he names the sky his own.

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

The Rose the Grew From Concrete by Tupac Shakur


Here now are Tupac’s most honest and intimate thoughts conveyed through the pure art of poetry…

Written in his own hand at the age of nineteen,

they embrace his spirit, his energy…and his ultimate message of hope.

The Coldest Winter Ever – Sister Soulja

The Bite of a Mango – Kamara Mariatu

For more info, check out this video:

The Book of Negroes – Lawrence Hill

For more info, check out this video:


Monster – Walter Dean Myers

New Books EVERY MONTH…

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Call for Writing Submissions!

Womenz Wordz blog is always on the look out for new poetry, stories, drama and lyrics. If you have something fresh to share with us, submit your piece to Womenz Wordz
*Note that the editors of Womenz Wordz blog have to right to reject any work that is inappropriate or offensive in nature. Also be patient, as it may take a few weeks to get your writing up on the blog.*

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Womenz Wordz is looking for talented art pieces to be showcased on our blog. Anything goes! If you have something to share with us, please submit to Womenz Wordz with "artwork" in the subject.

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